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Today's LGBT History Lesson - The Transgender Pride Flag

Posted on July 13, 2013 at 1:15 AM

By Dennis Stone


The reason for the existence of this site is our belief that millions of gay people in the 21st century are living transformative lives of freedom not possible until recently. And as a result large numbers of us now see our sexuality as just one of our many traits rather than the one trait that dominates our identity.


Unfortunately, there is no “new millennial” experience for most transgendered people. Ignorance, disdain and discrimination are still common among the general population. And even, shockingly, among a distressingly large number of gay people. Progress is being made, as transgender identity is increasingly being specifically added to anti-discrimination language and policies. But there is a long, long way to go before the people represented by the “T” in LGBT can feel the same liberation that many of us in the “G” group feel today, and sometimes take for granted.


The Rainbow Flag is a large part of our history, representing diversity in its many colors. But did you know there is a Transgender Pride Flag? Here it is:




The flag was designed in the late 1990s by Monica Helms, a transgender woman. I’ll let her describe the meaning of the stripes. “The stripes at the top and bottom are light blue, the traditional color for baby boys. The stripes next to them are pink, the traditional color for baby girls. The stripe in the middle is white, for those who are intersex, transitioning or consider themselves having a neutral or undefined gender.”


The flag is designed with that pattern so that it is not possible to fly it upside down. It can’t be flown “wrong” since there is no wrong way to be gendered.


I’ve seen a couple of different dates as to when the flag was first flown. According to LGBT Weekly it was first flown in 1998 in Phoenix, AZ. It is most prominent on November 20 of each year, which is the Transgender Day Of Remembrance, when the victims of anti-transgender violence are remembered and celebrated.


I would like to see a lot more of the Transgender Pride Flag in the coming years.

Categories: History Lessons

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1 Comment

Reply The_Fixer
6:24 PM on July 14, 2013 
Good history lesson! I was not too familiar with the Transgender Pride flag, and although I knew it existed, it's nice to read of the history of it. This weekend I saw someone wearing one as a cape at our local Pride festival, and was glad I had read this article. Thanks for posting this, Dennis.